Local Efforts

Local efforts or campaigns can be an essential way to raise awareness about unnecessary vehicle idling and can be important in supplementing Vermont's prohibited idling of motor vehicles law. These efforts can include a municipality, spearheaded by the town's energy committee, or local or regional organization. The focus can be about idling specifically or as a component of a larger effort dealing with issues of transportation or energy conservation in a town, community, or school. The law does not list purposeful steps to reduce idling or spell out no-idling procedures. A town's governmental authority can pass a town-wide resolution that does. A school board can adopt a no-idling policy or a school district can adopt an administrative procedure for vehicles other than school buses as part of Vermont's school bus idling rule on school property. For more information on idling in the school community, visit the Schools page.

 

Idle-Free VT wants to hear about and list your local campaign!

                         No idling signs

 

MUNICIPALITIES, SCHOOLS, BUSINESSES or others interested in high quality, metal No Idling signs for one or more strategic locations: generic or custom made signs can be ordered through the Vermont Agency of Human Services, Vermont Offender Work Programs. Many school no-idling signs issued following enactment of the school bus idling rule in 2008 are now faded; it's time to order new signs!

 

Contact: Agency of Human Services, Vermont Offender Work Programs (VOWP), Vermont Correctional Industries (VCI)

Dustin Horne, VCI Program Coordinator, VCI Print and Sign Shop. 802-334-8995

Attention: Town Energy Committees or community groups

 

Adopt a no-idling resolution or energy conservation policy for your town

 

Join the more than 15 Vermont towns that have adopted resolutions or policies to achieve a low-hanging fruit way to conserve energy, improve community health, cut greenhouse gas emissions and save the town and taxpayers money. These measures can work in harmony with Vermont's prohibited idling of motor vehicles law.

 

A No-Idling Resolution or Energy Conservation Policy is an awareness raising measure in conjunction with Vermont's prohibited idling of motor vehicles law that can include signs posted in strategic locations as well as literature handouts and notification of policy. Resolution or Policy approval most often goes through a town selectboard or a city administration. Read below how towns adopted policies. Here's a generic No Idling Resolution to use as a guideline. Language can be added specific to your town. For Energy Conservation Policy language, read below for Shelburne's (2010) and Richmond's (2007).

Municipalities: towns & cities with no-idling policies, resolutions or other efforts

 

2013

 

EAST MONTPELIER

TOWN ADOPTS IDLING REDUCTION POLICY

The Vermont Dept. of Health Idle-Free VT Idle-Free for Fleet$ project worked with Bruce Johnson, Town Administrator, to help in the process of selectboard approval of policy adoption.

 

STRAFFORD

TOWN ADOPTS IDLING REDUCTION POLICY

The Vermont Dept. of Health Idle-Free VT Idle-Free for Fleet$ project worked with Jon MacKinnon, Road Foreman, to help in the process of selectboard approval of policy adoption.

 

2011

 

MENDON

HIGHWAY DEPT. ADOPTS IDLING REDUCTION POLICY

The American Lung Association's Vermont Idle-Free Fleets program worked with Bill Ellis, Road Foreman, and Sara Tully, Town Administrator, to help in the process of selectboard approval of policy adoption.

 

JERICHO

HIGHWAY DEPT. & TOWN ADOPTS NO IDLING RESOLUTION

The American Lung Association's Vermont Idle-Free Fleets program worked with Kenny Barkyoumb, Jericho Highway Dept. Road Commissioner, and Todd Odit, Town Administrator, to help in the process of selectboard approval of policy adoption. The Jericho Energy Task Force spearheaded the effort to get selectboard approval of the Town no idling resolution. In support of the new resolution, the Jericho Energy Task Force sponsored an no idling poster contest at Jericho Elementary School. There are plans to place the winning entry, from Julie Parker’s fifth grade class, at businesses and other locations around town.

 

WINOOSKI

DEPT. OF PUBLIC WORKS ADOPTS IDLING REDUCTION POLICY

The American Lung Association's Vermont Idle-Free Fleets program worked with Jay Nadeau, Water Superintendent, Steve *Palmer, City Engineer, and Katherine R. Decarreau, City Manager, to help with policy adoption.

 

PITTSFORD

HIGHWAY DEPT. ADOPTS IDLING REDUCTION POLICY

The American Lung Association's Vermont Idle-Free Fleets program worked with Shawn Erickson, Highway Foreman, and John Haverstock, Town Manager, to help in the process of selectboard approval of policy adoption.

 

COLCHESTER

DEPT. OF PUBLIC WORKS ADOPTS IDLING REDUCTION POLICY

The American Lung Association's Vermont Idle-Free Fleets program worked with Brian Tuttle, Operations Manager, to help with policy adoption.

 

 

2010

 

SHELBURNE

TOWN ADOPTS ENERGY CONSERVATION POLICY

The town of Shelburne adopted an Energy Conservation Policy. The purposes of this policy are to: save taxpayer dollars by reducing town operating costs; promote investments in long-term energy and dollar savings; reduce pollution; and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. No idling signs will be installed. The American Lung Association's Vermont Idle-Free Fleets program worked with Bernie Gagnon, Director of Public Works, and Paul Bohne, Town Manager, to help in the process of selectboard approval of policy adoption.

 

MILTON

DEPT. OF PUBLIC WORKS ADOPTS IDLING REDUCTION POLICY

The American Lung Association's Vermont Idle-Free Fleets program worked with David Antone, Highway Supervisor, and Brian M. Palaia, Town Manager, to help with policy adoption.

 

THETFORD

A town-wide no idling resolution effort by SERG and the Thetford Energy Committee was rejected by the selectboard in favor of installation of no idling signs and an eventual consideration to adopt a town fleet idling reduction policy.

 

WILLISTON

DEPT. OF PUBLIC WORKS & RECREATION ADOPTS IDLING REDUCTION POLICY

The American Lung Association's Vermont Idle-Free Fleets program worked with Bruce K. Hoar, Director of Public Works, to help with policy adoption.

 

 

2009

 

BURLINGTON

BURLINGTON ADOPTS CHANGES TO NO IDLING ORDINANCE (Chapter 20 Motor Vehicles and Traffic > 20-55 General Prohibitions - scroll to (e) )

Burlington reduced the maximum allowed idling when parked time from five to three minutes (with exemptions) in the city's ordinance updated by the Department of Public Works Commission. Changes to the existing ordinance were brought forth by a growing concern for public health – particularly the health of Burlington’s youngest citizens – and Burlington’s overall air quality. Besides reducing the allowed idling time, the April 1 to Nov. 1 season exemption was eliminated, making the ordinance effective year-round. The new ordinance also notes that a violation is the same civil penalty as for metered parking violations.

 

DUMMERSTON

TOWN ADOPTS NO IDLING RESOLUTION

The Town of Dummerston selectboard, on recommendation of the Dummerston Energy Committee (DEC), unanimously adopted a No Idling Resolution. This non-binding resolution seeks to save energy, protect the environment and the health of Town residents by limiting idling to two minutes, with exceptions. The resolution calls for no idling signs to be installed and information literature distributed in appropriate Town locations when available.

 

 

2008

 

STOWE

STOWE REPORTER, "IDLING CARS TARGET OF STOWE EFFORT"

Stowe CAN--the Stowe Energy and Climate Action Network--in one of several of their energy and climate change related initiatives--educates members of the Stowe community in shutting off their vehicle engines when parked. They distribute pink notices (placing under windshield wipers of cars idling while parked) that say, "THANK YOU FOR NOT IDLING WHEN PARKED" along with bulleted points.

 

PLAINFIELD

TOWN ADOPTS NO IDLING RESOLUTION

Robert Atchinson, Plainfield Energy Coordinator introduced a resolution to restrict vehicle idling at the Plainfield town meeting. The resolution passed unanimously on a voice vote. While non-binding, the selectboard has given permission for this information to be posted in the public venues of Plainfield.

 

NEWFANE

TOWN ADOPTS NO IDLING RESOLUTION

The selectboard of Newfane, on recommendation of selectboard member Dan Dewalt, voted unanimously to adopt a no idling resolution. It includes a one minute idling maximum with exceptions. No-idle signs will be installed at appropriate locations when available.

 

 

2007

 

MIDDLEBURY

TOWN ADOPTS IDLE-FREE RESOLUTION

The Middlebury selectboard unanimously passed an idle-free resolution as recommended by Laura Asermily, Middlebury Energy Committee coordinator. As part of the educational effort of this resolution, no-idle signs are posted at strategic locations throughout the town. Report in the Addison Independent: "Middlebury to mull car idling policy". News report on WCAX-TV channel 3 news about Middlebury's idling resolution, "No Idle Task".

 

RICHMOND

TOWN ADOPTS ENERGY CONSERVATION POLICY

The town of Richmond adopted an Energy Conservation Policy. Each town department will monitor and evaluate their energy usage in their respective buildings and vehicles. Idle reduction is a component of this policy. To encourage customers not to idle, signs will be posted at Town facilities, other public areas and at street intersections. Town employees will abide by a specific idling limitation procedure.

 

PUTNEY

TOWN ADOPTS NO IDLING RESOLUTION

Through the efforts of PEC (Putney Energy Committee), led by Chairperson and Putney Energy Committee coordinator Daniel Hoviss, the Town of Putney selectboard approved a no idling resolution that limits idling to two minutes, effective June 2007. PEC has designed several signs and will be deploying signs around town and at the schools.

 

BRATTLEBORO

TOWN ADOPTS NO IDLING RESOLUTION

Paul Cameron, executive director of Brattleboro Climate Protection, with support from Tim Stevenson, Post Oil Solutions, Brattleboro and students of the Compass School of Westminster Station (Windham County) worked with the Brattleboro selectboard to approved a no idling resolution. This includes posting of no-idle signs (like this one at Brattleboro Union High School) for Brattleboro. Report in the Bratteboro Reformer: "Board: turn off engines".

 

BURLINGTON

REAPPLICATION OF EXISTING CITY IDLING ORDINANCE

In an effort spearheaded by the Burlington Legacy Project, Mayor Bob Kiss, Police Chief Tom Tremblay and other city department heads urged residents to join public employees in creating "an idle-free Burlington", by dusting off a long existing but unenforced idling ordinance, amid the rising public concern over greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. Report in the Burlington Free Press: "Burlington announces no-idling campaign".